Interview with Boston Globe

““I don’t have to use it, but it’s my favorite,” said Wiseman, who has little use for digital photography because “it never gives me that punch my work usually had.””

New55 film made it’s Kickstarter Goal!! And Bob Crowley rocks! Check out the piece in the Boston Globe. And check out the New55Project website. 🙂

 

And please enjoy a new image:

©2014 Zoe Wiseman - model: St. Merrique
©2014 Zoe Wiseman – model: St. Merrique

New55 Film Kickstarter Project

If you follow my blog and my work you know what a Polaroid lover I am. And you may have seen my previous post about the New55 film being developed to replace Polaroid Type 55 film. This is an extremely important tool for artists and I hope you will join me in pledging at Kickstarter.  There’s 28 days to go and they’ve already raised almost $100,000.00 of their $400,000.00 goal in order to make a viable product.

I was lucky to be able to test the film and be a part of the beginnings. And I really hope it comes to fruition because I NEED IT FOR MY WORK. I pledged $750.00. Please kick them a little starter fuel to bring this film back into the world of creativity.

Attached is an image I made using the New55 film. I want MORE!!!

 

© 2012 Zoe Wiseman - New55 FILM negative second exposure - model: St. Merrique
© 2012 Zoe Wiseman – New55 FILM negative second exposure – model: St. Merrique

From the Kickstarter Page…

MANUFACTURING PLAN

We’ve already contacted several potential suppliers to get quotes on parts and line up specification and delivery steps, but there is more to do.

The 4×5 sheet film component — the negative — could come from any one of five potential suppliers including Kodak, Ilford, Foma, Adox or Shanghai.  We still need to determine through more testing which negative works the best with the receiver sheet and developer that is finally chosen. The plan is to use a cubic grained emulsion, since this is known to have rapid processing capability and fast transfer to the positive.

The receiver sheet — the positive print — requires significant research and development. Most of the New55 FILM examples you have seen used 20×24 Studios’coaterless receiver sheet. We hope to work with 20×24 Studios to create a reliable supply of receiver for this project and the future, if possible, as coaterless sheets are also compatible with the 20×24 camera. But, that type of sheet is very complex and has at least 8 layers to it.  A coater-type receiver sheet, more in keeping with “Old T55” is also a possibility and may be a necessity if we are not able to make the coaterless type.  Coater type sheets are somewhat less complex to make, but still have 6 layers. The coating is only one of several important requirements for the receiver: It must have just the right stiffness, thickness and be free of curl. It also has to be light proof, and not swell and shrink during processing. Quite a set of requirements for what looks like just a piece of paper.

An “edge taper” is a machine that we will investigate to assemble the top and bottom of the sleeve together into a peelable assembly. It is assumed that some kind of inking or printing needs to go on this piece so that users will know which is the “lens side”. This machine will have to be designed from the ground up, then built on the premises. It is a significant amount of work and expense.

Each envelope also needs a “stop” which is a thick paper bar bonded to the outside. The purpose of the stop is to prevent the user from pulling the sleeve out too far during exposure. A cutting tool and assembly fixture, and adhesive applicator are required. At this moment, we think that a thermal adhesive and thermal press can apply this strip, using a guide tool, and also perform some of the final thermal bonding on the end of the envelope to allow easier peeling. Two machines/fixtures are needed, at least.

The metal clips that slide into the 545 holder are important and have to be made carefully. The old T55 clip was made with soft steel that had been painted. Painting adds a lot of cost to a sheet metal part and we think it will be easier and better to use a stainless steel clip of a lighter and stronger gauge. Either way we will be buying a tool for use in four-slide machines, and have that part supplied to us by one or more vendors. Our hope is that we do this once, and not have to modify the tooling. If we have a problem, we will possibly have to make new tooling and do other things.

Once we have clips, they must be securely attached to the tongue – a part that holds both the negative, and the chemical pod. The tool used for crimping and thermal adhesive steps has to be designed, built, and tested, and then we have to make sure it can be assembled repeatably and reliably.

The “pod” is a critical component. It has to be sealed and yet also has to burst in just the right directions with just the right amount of pressure. As of this writing, 20×24 is offering to produce these for us at a per-unit cost. Not only is the assembly of the pod critical, what goes in it is also crucial, as it contains developer, fixer, solvent, thickener and toners, along with pH boosting ingredients needed for rapid diffusion transfer reversal to take place. 20×24’s formula for their black and white film is the starting point, and may have to be reformulated depending on the final negative stock and the characteristics of the receiver sheet. Production of the chemical pod is a major undertaking and will happen in parallel with development of the other components.

The entire process of development and manufacturing New55 FILM, and shipping the completed boxes of film to Kickstarter contributors is risky, and estimated to take eight months from the initial funding, but it could be delayed for a variety of reasons as there are long wait times for certain processes and materials to be made, cut, formed, coated etc.

MANAGEMENT

Bob Crowley, Founder (CV)

Sam Hiser, project CEO (CV)

 

 

My work on Your Daily Photograph

your daily photograph
featured on your daily photograph

It’s been so long! How are you? I’ve been in Australia at my yearly artist retreat. While I was away I got word that my work had been featured by the Duncan Miller Gallery in their newly formed website set to promote the work of contemporary, vintage and other well known images made by photographers. I was pleased to see the photo I made with Jazmine Dominique hanging out with Muhammad Ali. I think she looks just as strong. Kind of interesting seeing those images next to each other. Feminine and Masculine power. Nicely chosen, curators… nicely chosen. Their new site is called Your Daily Photograph and the images they’re sending out are superb. Masters and contemporary, emerging and vintage. You can subscribe to their site and get images delivered to your inbox daily.

Do so before my next image gets sent out! Which will be soon they tell me. I’ll post again when it’s up so you can see. Please click the image to be taken to the feature on their website where you can see the other images chosen.

Until then…

 

 

 

 

Friends of Barnes

The Art of the Steal is a very amazing look into the complexities of destruction. I hope anyone and everyone who loves art will watch and be taken by what happened to the collection of Dr. Barnes. You can rent it on Netfilx if you want to.

After watching it myself I found my fingers at google researching a bit about it and found myself on their website in a photograph by Lisa Kereszi. So I contacted them to let them know I would like to donate my work also.

Me and My Shadow ©2005 Zoe Wiseman - model: Candace Nirvana
Me and My Shadow ©2005 Zoe Wiseman – model: Candace Nirvana
Crack in the Mirror - © 2005 Zoe Wiseman - Model: Ida Mae
Crack in the Mirror – © 2005 Zoe Wiseman – Model: Ida Mae

 

If you would like to purchase these images to support Friends of Barnes please visit this link to find out how.

I wish I could have visited the REAL Barnes.

New55 FILM

I feel so happy (and lucky) to have been able to try out this film and be part of the very beginnings of bringing my way of working back to life. As I am sure those of you who love Polaroid Type 55 (and miss it dearly) are anxiously awaiting the day when you can go out and shoot and develop a negative right in the field may feel just by knowing that the negatives have been exposed. Once in a Blue Moon (when I shot the images) good things do happen! And it’s all thanks to Bob Crowley who has been working like crazy to produce the film again. Please visit the New55 FILM project website and get to know the new goodness!

I received the hand made film and immediately got nervous, “what if I mess this up?” Luckily it is so much like shooting with Polaroid Type 55 that from the first exposure, and handling it so very delicately, I lost that sense of nervousness and just started dancing (uncontrollable dancing happiness) around after each click of the shutter.

It fits in my i545 back just as easily as the Polaroid Type 55 does.

I still have a stash of Polaroid Type 55 locked away in a secret bunker so I was also able to shoot with both and compare the two films. Gladly, I had a model, St. Merrique, who is quite the pro so doing the same poses and remembering them wasn’t a big deal for her. Let’s hear it for awesome models!

Polaroid Type 55 in developing bucket
Polaroid Type 55 in developing bucket with the first pose and Positive next to the hand made New55 FILM and the old Polaroid Type 55 film side by side.

As you can see, it’s truly the beginnings of the film. Hand written instructions on the film sleeve and everything. It’s amazing what they have done so far in such a short amount of time. The “Stop” is obviously where you stop pulling up the sleeve before you expose your neg. The dotted lines are a guide for where you need to cut the sleeve open with scissors as this is truly the beginning of the film production. Shooting it like this really made me appreciate it so much more.

See the Polaroid Type 55 negative in the bucket of Sodium Sulfite with the pinkish chemicals washing off the negative, I didn’t get this as much with the New55. It was a bit pink, but not as much.

New55 FILM developing in Polaroid bucket
New55 FILM developing in Polaroid bucket

 

There are no attachments on the negative of New55 like there are on Polaroid Type 55 (paper – see above, first photo) – which I found to be lovely. A pure sheet of film that has been hand coated almost even resembling a platinum print. I allowed each New55 negative to sit in the bucket of Sodium Sulfite for 5-10 minutes. They suggested using Rapid Fix but I didn’t have any so I used Sodium Sulfite (to clear the chemicals off the neg) and it worked fine.

When you come back to it a white goo has formed on the negative which you have to gently smudge off by hand by carefully rubbing the negative. I suggest wearing rubber gloves for this but I didn’t have any so I just sacrificed myself and dove in naked.

This is what the negative looks like before peeling it off of the sleeve to dip in the bucket. Notice the hand taped love! So cool.

New55 Negative on Sleeve
New55 Negative on Sleeve with hand made love

The white section on the sleeve that holds the negative in place are the chemical pods. When you yank the film out of the i545 back these chemicals get dispersed so a positive side of the negative can develop. An immediate contact print. (and yes, that’s a rubix cube)

new55 and type55 positives side by side
new55 and type55 positives side by side

The positives of the two films are completely different. The New55 positive (on the left) looks like a platinum print while the Polaroid Type 55 positive looks like a straight black and white image. The developing time for the New55 is 2 minutes while the developing time for the Polaroid Type 55 is about 20 seconds. I wish I would have tried developing the New55 just a little bit longer, maybe 3 minutes, to see what it would have looked like, but I JUST thought of that this second. I wonder if it would give me more contrast or darken it a bit. I hope I get to try that out some day soon!

I posted this image on Facebook right after I shot it (before it got flagged by a prude and facebook deleted it) and someone (I forget who) asked me a question that I’ve heard lots of times from photographers. Do you have to expose for the negative or the positive to get a good positive side? Photographers who don’t religiously (I’m a zealot) use Polaroid Pos/Neg always seem to think that the exposure for the positive is different than the exposure of the negative. I THINK THIS IS A MYTH. The way the positive develops is completely different to how the negative develops. And who wants the positive anyway? It’s really only a contact sheet. The way you get a good Positive is not to peel apart the two pieces (the negative and the positive) before the developing time is up. With Polaroid Type 55 in 75 degrees that’s 20 seconds. If I want my negative to be darker I let it develop more (30-40 seconds). If I want it to be lighter, I peel it apart after 5 seconds. Just like you would in a darkroom under a lamp when you’re printing. Or if you’d leave a print in the developer for too long it would get too dark. But I just don’t put a lot of interest into the positive side of the film. It only shows me if I’m on target and if I shot what I thought I shot, or if I need to try it again. Plus, the model can see if she needs to adjust her pose or I can see if I need to adjust my exposure a bit. The negative is the big deal, the big kahuna, the whole enchilada… If I wanted a positive “only” why would I bother shooting pos/neg film? I’ve always wondered about this when some photographers say this about the exposure thing. And I could be wrong… I’ve just never concerned myself with the positive. Unless it pertains to happiness.

Speaking of HAPPINESS!!!!!!!! Check out the negatives!

©2012 Zoe Wiseman New55 FILM first exposure - model: St. Merrique
©2012 Zoe Wiseman New55 FILM first exposure – model: St. Merrique

and expired Polaroid Type 55 (peeling negative sadness)

© 2012 Zoe Wiseman Polaroid Type 55 Negative - model: St. Merrique
© 2012 Zoe Wiseman Polaroid Type 55 Negative – model: St. Merrique

 

If you have followed my work at all and have seen my Polaroid Type 85 or 665 images where I solarize the negatives, you will understand why I like the New55 film better than the Polaroid Type 55. What depth and funkiness and just WOW awesome!

New55 and Polaroid Type 55 side by side
New55 and Polaroid Type 55 side by side

After testing my first image (it’s a bit lighter than I’d ultimately like it) shooting at 50 ISO, I decided to change my settings just a tiny bit. I don’t remember exactly how much. But just a tad. So I probably shot the second exposure at about 35 ISO. I just had an impulse to do it and it worked out great.

 

© 2012 Zoe Wiseman - New55 FILM negative second exposure - model: St. Merrique
© 2012 Zoe Wiseman – New55 FILM negative second exposure – model: St. Merrique

And the Polaroid Type 55 for comparison (shot at 50 ISO):

© 2012 Zoe Wiseman - Polaroid Type 55 negative - model: St. Merrique
© 2012 Zoe Wiseman – Polaroid Type 55 negative – model: St. Merrique

 

So as you can see, much different films, but just beautiful, luscious, and YUMMY. For my work… this is what I want! The New55 Film reminds me more of the Polaroid 665 or 85 films than the 55 film. With the 665 you would always get little surprises that would put a unique spin on the image. I live for those little surprises. I enjoyed shooting with Type 85 on a Holga with a Polaroid back way more than I enjoyed shooting with Type 55 because of this. Like shooting a Holga with a peculiar light leak or solarizing your negatives in the sun. (see an earlier post I made about this here: http://www.zoewiseman.com/ZW/2011/08/04/85/)

Sure – you can get tack sharp images with a Hassy or some digital contraption, but I have always loved quirks. The quirkier the better. And the New55 film has got quirky covered.

The next 3 images were all shot at 50 ISO.

© 2012 Zoe Wiseman - New55 FILM - model: St. Merrique
© 2012 Zoe Wiseman – New55 FILM – model: St. Merrique

 

With the image below this text, I tried peeling it at one minute instead of 2 minutes (the total developing time) to see if I could get some solarization happening by holding it up to the sun. I think that’s what the fog bit is on the lower left and the funky line near the top edge. I wish I would have been braver and pulled the negative at 2 seconds to see what would happen, but testing it just proves to me it’s possible – I just got chicken and waited too long. (see an earlier post I made about this here: http://www.zoewiseman.com/ZW/2011/08/04/85/ if you don’t know what I’m talking about)

© 2012 Zoe Wiseman - New55 FILM - model: St. Merrique
© 2012 Zoe Wiseman – New55 FILM – model: St. Merrique – an failed attempt at solarization of the negative.

And on this image below… as I was putting the film into the film holder the sleeve slipped off about a quarter inch. I caught it in time before it exposed the entire negative (cursing at myself), but as you can see it has the line at the top of her head where the sleeve slipped.  I think it may have fogged the negative just a little bit because of that. But I love the way it turned out anyway.

© 2012 Zoe Wiseman - New55 FILM negative - model: St. Merrique
© 2012 Zoe Wiseman – New55 FILM negative – model: St. Merrique

 

So those are the 5 images I was able to shoot from the 5 slides of film I received. I would like more please! haha. I’m just happy I have the negatives and it worked and that I didn’t disappoint myself or Bob as he’s worked tirelessly to make this happen. Does anyone have a few hundred thousand dollars lying around? Production must commence! If you are an investor and believe in art related goodness… give Bob your money so I can shoot this film every day. Please? With sugar on top?

One of the other things I love about the negative is it conforms to all the standard 4×5 film holders! Especially for the film holders on my scanner. The Polaroid Type 55 negative is just a smidgen larger than a 4×5, so trying to get that huge negative into a 4×5 film holder and scan the entire negative can be quite the challenge. The New55 negative fits in perfect with no fuss at all. It’s a true 4×5 negative.

I took some iPhone snaps of what I’m talking about so you can try to see what I mean.

Polaroid Type 55 Negative trying to fit into the 4x5 film holder for the Epson V750
Polaroid Type 55 Negative trying to fit into the 4×5 film holder for the Epson V750 – look at each edge. The right side has overlap.

 

New55 FILM fits into the Epson V750 film holders perfectly
New55 FILM fits into the Epson V750 film holders perfectly – zero overlap

 

Polaroid Type 55 on left - New55 FILM on right
Polaroid Type 55 on left – New55 FILM on right – the Polaroid film doesn’t quite sit inside the Film Sleeve the way it should compared to the New55 FILM which fits in perfect.

 

Please let me know if you have any questions about my experience using the film below in the comments section. I hope I covered everything! If not, just ask! And if you have any questions about the production or that sort of thing – Please visit the New55 FILM project website and get to know the new goodness! Bob Crowley answers a lot of questions about this and his FAQ will tell you a bit too. And don’t forget to send him a few hundred thousand dollars. Annenberg… are you listening? Please please please? 🙂

Everyone have a very safe and sober Labor Day! Much love!

The Happy Muse ~ Julia Dean Workshops

I’ll be teaching a workshop with Julia Dean Photo Workshops in May with Larva X called the Happy Muse. JDPW is giving an early bird discount for enrolling now. Here is the information! I hope to meet you. It will be taught on the weekends.

9 Happy Muses
9 Happy Muses

The Happy Muse

Knowing how to work with a model is crucial when producing memorable photographs. This workshop, taught by photographer and former model Zoe Wiseman & fashion, figure model Larva X demonstrates how to establish a positive working relationship between artist and model and the importance of making a model comfortable and relaxed – The Happy Muse.

The first weekend will include lecture and an instructional photo shoot. Zoe will photograph Larva while students observe how each of them communicates with one another. Topics covered include communication that procures great flow during a shoot, proper etiquette before and after the shoot, the importance of establishing a connection between model and photographer, handling releases, and setting up shoots 2, 3, 4, and 5. Emphasis will be on making the model happy so he or she will want to continue the working relationship. Two shooting sessions with professional figure models will provide students with an opportunity to put theory into practice. Each session will be followed by a group critique.

A portion of the workshop will also talk about marketing student work and the importance of social media. Digital and film users are welcome, although film users may not have the time to scan and process their images for group critiques. Participants will work with a 3:1 student to model ratio.

Dates: May 7 – 22

Workshop fee: $535 + $150 figure model fee

Enrollment limit: 15 students

6 Session(s)
Sat, Sun 10 am – 1 pm, May 7, 2011 – May 22, 2011

Instructor(s): Zoe Wiseman & Larva X
Location: JDPW

Additional Information:
May 14 and May 21 meeting times may vary.

Uninhibited Perfection
Uninhibited Perfection

West Hollywood Book Fair Appearance 9.26.10

Hi y’all! I’ll be at the City of West Hollywood Book Fair signing copies of my limited edition book, Fiat Lux. If you bought one of my books but never had a chance to get it signed feel free to drop by and I’ll sign it for you. I’ll also have about 10 books there for sale, I’m running out so hurry! Hope to see some of you there.

City of West Hollywood Book Fair
City of West Hollywood Book Fair

A&I Books is proud to announce its sponsorship and first-time participation in the 9th Annual West Hollywood Book Fair, Sunday, September 26, 2010. A division of A&I Photographic and Digital, A&I Books is a leading printer and publisher of photography books.

“We are dedicated to serving the West Hollywood community, where so many of our artists live and work, and look forward to being part of the West Hollywood Book Fair’s exciting celebration of books,” says A&I’s co-owners Baret Lepejian and Vic Lepejian.

The A&I booth at the one-day event in West Hollywood Park will feature a demonstration of BookCreator, A&I’s free online self-publishing software that allows anyone to design and print their own photo book. Artists whose books have been printed by A&I will also be on hand to talk about their work and sign copies of their limited edition books. Artists include Jeff Sheng (“Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell”), Zoe Wiseman (“Fiat Lux”), and Kevin Gray (“American Cars”).

The 9th Annual West Hollywood Book Fair,

Sunday, September 26, 2010 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.,

West Hollywood Park, 647 N. San Vicente Blvd. 90069

A&I Books booth: E46.

Inside Analog Photography Interview

Scott Sheppard from Inside Analog Photography asked for an interview a couple months ago and I was happy to give it. Nervous because I don’t normally like to talk – I hate my voice – but thankfully I didn’t annoy myself as much as I thought I would. What a relief! Thanks Scott! I think he asked some great questions and enabled me to give a good interview because of it. Inside Analog Photography is a gem of a Podcast. So many great interviews with some of today’s most recognized photographers. I’m honored to be amongst them all. If you love photography, even if you shoot digital, you should subscribe. There’s a wealth of information inside this podcast. You can hear me directly here – CLICK! And you can visit Inside Analog Photography’s website and I’ll be there soon too.

Please enjoy a photo from my last shoot in the desert with Meghan Claire. I have to work with her again soon. She’s amazing.

Sublime Nude, Model: Meghan Claire @ 2010 Zoe Wiseman

The le Nu LA show took off without me, but this video shows my image I made of Rei on the wall – the Quadtych! I wrote the forward for the book and the show, curated by Astor Morgan, was a big success! Thank you to everyone at A&I again and to Astor. I missed the big opening night to be with my family for my grandfather’s funeral.



I was gone for a couple weeks down south, New Orleans to be exact. It was good to be home. It was sad knowing that they’re going through yet another tragedy. I went down to Venice, Louisiana so I could see the marshes and swamps one last time before they become a dead zone. I’m crying as I’m typing this. I can’t express how much I love Louisiana in words. I became who I am today there. I feel the hurt. Tragic beauty. That’s my city. Chicago doesn’t know the Blues like New Orleans does. Life is cheap there, and at the same time the most valuable commodity on earth. I don’t know why they always have the world punch them like it does, but as I’m trying to think on the positive side of things, their artistic expression wouldn’t be the way it is without all this tragedy. It doesn’t make it good, the people do. They are some of the strongest people in heart that I know. And their pain is my pain. And as the oil is starting to reach the shores of Pesacola, Florida tonight, I feel their pain too. I spent many days on those beaches. Knowing there’s no hope is absolutely heartbreaking. I can’t even begin to speak about the animals suffering or … I’ll end it there. Everyone please keep these people in your hearts. Let’s make them even stronger and more resilient.

Venice, Louisiana marsh land @2010 Zoe Wiseman
Venice, Louisiana marsh land @2010 Zoe Wiseman
Egret @2010 Zoe Wiseman